Blogs

SORTEE member voices – Miguel Camacho

[SORTEE member voices is a weekly Q&A with a different SORTEE member]     Name: Miguel Camacho.   Date: 02 July 2021.   Position: Postdoctoral researcher.   Research and/or work interests: I hold a PhD in conservation genetics and evolutionary biology. I am interested in using genetics and ecology to understand the origins of biodiversity and how to preserve it. I worked with mammals from Borneo and amphibians from the Iberian Peninsula.

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SORTEE member voices – Alec Christie

[SORTEE member voices is a weekly Q&A with a different SORTEE member]     Name: Alec Christie.   Date: 02 July 2021.   Position: Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Cambridge.   Research and/or work interests: I’m interested in how we can provide decision-makers with relevant and reliable scientific evidence to inform their decision-making. I’m also interested in developing decision support tools that help decision-makers combine and assess different sources of evidence (e.

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SORTEE member voices – Vijayan Jithin

[SORTEE member voices is a weekly Q&A with a different SORTEE member]     Name: Vijayan Jithin.   Date: 02 July 2021.   Position: Masters Student.   Research and/or work interests: I am interested in ecology, evolution and media. Currently my work focuses on habitat ecology, behavioral adaptations, and education.   What do you see as the greatest challenge facing the open / reliable / transparent science movement at large or specifically in ecology and evolutionary biology?

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The Replication Crisis is not a crisis for researchers - it is a crisis for society

Perverse incentives in research careers lead to poor research practices prevailing. This problem may not necessarily be a problem for researchers as their careers can benefit from questionable research practices. The end users of science (such as government agencies, policy makers and wider society) are the ones who are negatively impacted by poor science and we argue here that the systemic change must come from them and not from within the research community alone.

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